Dental Cavities / Tooth Decay Explained by Kingston Dentist

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Teeth cavities are caused by tooth decay. Tooth decay can affect the outer tooth surface (enamel), the middle section (dentine) and the centre of the tooth (the pulp). The more layers involved, the more severe the damage is. Natural bacteria living inside the mouth forms plaque, which interacts with debris from starchy and sugary food and turn them to acid. The acid dissolves the enamel over time and causes cavities. If the cavities are…

Oral Cancer Screening Explained by Surrey Dentist

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Oral Cancer screenings test people for early signs of oral cancer. Oral cancer is rare in the UK and once detected, treated patients have a 90% survival rate. The sign and symptoms: Oral cancer can be invisible in its early stages, once it develops it might not even cause pain or discomfort. Therefore, it is crucial for everyone to have an oral caner screening once a year. The common symptoms of oral cancer are:…

Diabetes and Gum Disease

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Most people are aware that diabetes harms their eyes, nervous system, kidneys and heart. However, they are less aware that it can also cause problems in their mouth. People with diabetes are at risk of gum disease: an infection that harms the gums and the bone that holds the teeth in place. Gum disease (periodontal disease) at its severe stage causes problems with chewing and leads to tooth loss. Thickening blood vessels are a…

Dentist Open Day at Surbiton Smile Centre

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Every Mondays till 15th Dec This is a great opportunity for you and your family to come and meet our dental team and discuss any concern you have about your teeth, such as missing teeth, poor fitting denture, gum problems, loose teeth, headaches, jaw problems, crooked and discoloured teeth. Due to popularity of this event to avoid disappointment book a place in advance.

Surbiton Smile Centre proud to receive such a great review from a patient

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We received this kind review this morning and thank dear Lynn for trusting and believing in us with her dental health care. I have been receiving excellent dental care from Dr Simin Soltani at the Surbiton Smile Centre for many years now. Every procedure from fillings, crowns, whitening to an implant has been fully discussed from start to finish, such that I have every faith that the best possible treatment plan for me personally…

Gum disease (Periodontal Disease), symptoms and treatment explained by Kingston Upon Thames dentist

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Gum disease is inflammation of the gum caused by poor oral hygiene. Bacteria forms a sticky colourless plaque on the teeth. Daily brushing and flossing helps to remove the plaque. If the plaque is not removed regularly, it forms a hard surface on the teeth called tartar that can only be removed through professional cleaning by a dental hygienist. If plaque accumulation is not addressed early, it can lead to underplaying tissues and bone…

Kingston dentist explains gum disease and its long term health problems

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There are a lot of studies that suggest oral health can no longer be separated from overall health. More and more studies are finding a number of negative health conditions and systemic diseases that are linked to periodontal disease. Below are some of the findings by the largest authorities on oral health to give you an idea of what health treats we have to be aware of when it comes to periodontal disease: Researchers…

Childrens dentist in Surbiton, Surrey

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A beautiful smile is a huge asset – but that smile needs looking after from an early age. Here at Surbiton Smile children dentistry, our aim is to help children learn about proper oral hygiene and develop good dental health habits that will last a lifetime.   Parents play a significant role in maintaining their children’s oral health. Providing oral health education to parents is essential for teaching children healthy habits and preventing early…

Bad Breath Dentist | Halitosis Theraphy in Surrey

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Bad breath, also known as halitosis, is a breath that has an unpleasant odour. It can occur occasionally or can be persistent depending on the cause. The bacteria that lives in the mouth, especially on the back of the tongue, are the primary causes of bad breath. The mouth’s warm, moist conditions make an ideal environment for these bacteria to grow. The following are the main reasons for bad breath. Poor dental hygiene: Infrequent…

Bleeding gums can be a sign of gum disease, do not ignore it, Surrey dentist explains

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If you experience bleeding gums while you are brushing you teeth, don’t consider it as normal. A Surrey dentist specialising in gum disease treatment explains: the bleeding is a disease process called gingivitis. It is caused by bacteria and if not cured can cause tooth loss and some serious health conditions. These include systemic diseases such as cardiovascular disease, stroke, and bacterial pneumonia. If gums are not treated at this stage, it can progress…

Kingston Dentist Talks About Acid Wear.

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Did you know that many of the foods and drinks we enjoy as part of a modern diet (including soft drinks, fruit juices, wine, fruit teas, certain fruits and vegetables, and balsamic vinegar) contain acids that can temporarily soften tooth enamel? This is a concern, because acid-softened tooth enamel can be more easily worn away during brushing. This condition, commonly known as “acid wear” or “acid erosion”, can result in sensitive and/or discoloured teeth…

Mouth piercing health issues explained by dentist in Surbiton

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The fashion of “body art” is very popular, especially as many high profile celebrities have had tattoos, piercings and other decorations applied to their bodies. Mouth decorations, especially piercing, is particularly fashionable, but does carry risks, not only to the teeth and mouth itself, but also to your general health. There is little control over who may set up a body piercing studio. Sterilising equipment e.g. autoclaves, are expensive and some practitioners may not…

Tooth Ware Explained by Surrey Dentist

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Definitions of tooth wear Different countries interpret the definition slightly. The focus tends to be on erosion, but abrasion and attrition are also important, and these are combined with erosion, the result is extremely damaging. Clinical appearance of erosion A classic picture of erosion is cupping out of the occlusal surface and exposed dentine. In some patients, there is palatal erosion and exposed pulp, which is usually indicative of erosion from regurgitation acid. Clinical…

What is Gum Disease? Discussed by Kingston Dentist

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Gum disease describes inflammation of gingival tissues as a result of a build-up of bacterial plaque, and it is extremely common – in the UK, 83% of adults show signs of gum disease. Depending on its severity, gum disease can be classified either as gingivitis or periodontitis. Gingivitis Gingivitis is the milder form of the condition, consisting of an irritation of gum tissues which is reversible with treatment to help remove and control the…

Sensitive Teeth Explained by Subiton Dentist

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Do You Suffer From Painful Teeth Due to Tooth Sensitivity? Do your teeth twinge when you eat cold foods like ice cream or drink hot tea? Do you suffer short, sharp pain due to tooth sensitivity? Is your sensitivity a daily problem or perhaps just an occasional annoyance? Chances are you have “dentine hypersensitivity”, another name for sensitive teeth. Dentine hypersensitivity can occur daily or it might just be an infrequent tooth twinge. This…

What is Dentine Hypersensitivity? Explained by Surbiton Dentist

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Dentine hypersensitivity, or tooth sensitivity, is characterised by a short, sharp pain arising from exposed dentine in response to stimuli (typically thermal, evaporative, tactile, osmotic or chemical) which cannot be ascribed to any other form of dental defect or pathology.It can also manifest as a dull, throbbing ache.Despite its name, dentine hypersensitivity does not indicate sensitivity of the dentine – which does not feel pain or sensitivity – but the response of the pulp…

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